New brake pads and rotors with only 18,500 miles on car?? - Club Crosstrek | Subaru XV Crosstrek Forums
Club Crosstrek | Subaru XV Crosstrek Forums
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-11-2016, 10:22 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 20
My Vehicle: 2013 Subaru Crosstrek XV Premium (Tangerine Orange Pearl)
Question New brake pads and rotors with only 18,500 miles on car??

Hi everyone.

I have a question about the life span of brake pads and rotors. I've owned my Subaru Crosstrek for 3 years and 6 months. I haven't put many miles on it in those three years - since I live right across the street from my job. It sits outside, parked next to my home. At the time of the being informed about needing new pads and rotors my car had 18,500 miles on it.

My mechanic told me last month that I need new brake pads and rotors for the front and that the back would follow a month or two after. However, my dealership (not my favorite place) told me during my last oil change and inspection that my brakes "looked" fine. Though, they didn't drive the car or take the wheels off to look, which my other mechanic did.

Is it normal for brake pads and rotors to need replacing with such low mileage? Or will hardly driving a vehicle, that sits outside in the elements, create a condition for premature wear?

I took the advice of my mechanic and got the pads and rotors replaced. I also took photos of the old pads and rotors. Have a look and tell me if it looks like replacing them needed to be done.

Here's the URL to the photos slideshow: Crosstrek Old Pads And Rotors Slideshow by solarwnz | Photobucket

Thanks for any insight you can bring!

solarwnz is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-11-2016, 10:48 PM   #2
Member
 
KLEMMER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 79
My Vehicle: 2014 XV Crosstrek 2.0 Limited
Default

From the look of things I would say the old parts are dirty and could use a wire brush and some brake clean. Not a reason to replace unless a problem was present. I would question why the mechanic suggested replacement if you didn't have an issue.

I changed pads only at 44k miles just in time for the rears, the fronts were in slightly better shape. This was in just over 2 years though. I scuffed up the rotor surfaces, cleaned up all the loose scale and brake dust, inspected the slide pin boots and sprayed them down with brake clean. A good practice is to inspect and clean brakes quarterly. Especially if you live in the winter salt zones.

Pads and rotors are covered under the 3/36 (not that it would have helped you) and the dealer would just do a visual inspection during the oil change. Dealers are not looking for problems unless you direct them too, and even then some are incompetent.
__________________
2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek 2.0i Limited Ice Silver
Moon/Nav
Aero Bars, Seat back and Cargo protector, Console tray, Mud guards, Door and Rear Bumper guards
Husky liners
Torklift 2" hitch
KLEMMER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 12:12 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 29
Default

Some of those pads still had quite a bit of pad left. And why not turn the rotors? Looked a little premature to me, but I'm no auto mechanic.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
tartis is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-12-2016, 12:33 AM   #4
Member
 
mifiremedic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 70
My Vehicle: 2013, Premium, Dark Gray Metallic
Default

I also am not a mechanic, with that said, I have done many brake jobs in the last 35 years. Depending on your driving, front pads should last in the 30,000 mile area. Back pads a lot longer. Fronts take most of the load. Rotors do not always need turning or replacing each time you do the pads. Rotors will warp and create wobble during braking and driving. Rotors warp due to heat build up, or more common due to over tightening lug nuts. I have had rotors fail due to divots caused by air pockets in the casting (Honda). It appears there is a lot of "meat" left on your pads and the rotors look pretty good too....... Just my $.02 worth.
mifiremedic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 12:34 AM   #5
Member
 
mifiremedic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 70
My Vehicle: 2013, Premium, Dark Gray Metallic
Default

Brake not break
mifiremedic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 02:49 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Cogen Man's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 317
My Vehicle: 2019 Limited/EyeSight
Default

My $.02. A good clean up of the pads and rotors would have been fine. 18,500 miles is way too soon if no issues were noticed. Rust is a big factor. I hope you had zinc coated rotors installed. I believe the zinc helps with the rust prevention. Turning rotors usually results in them overheating and warping faster. Maybe 1 turn on a lathe would be okay but after that best to go with new rotors and pads.
__________________
2019 Limited with EyeSight.
Cogen Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 03:19 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 30
My Vehicle: Former 2014 Crosstrek owner
Default

It only takes one good brake lock up to cook the OEM pads. At 35 K (mostly hway driving) mine were so glazed they felt like metal to metal with the typical left front pulsing from a warped rotor. Replace with Centric (StopTech) premium Ceramic pad/rotor set for the front and premium ceramic pads for the rear (still could have got some more miles from the rears) lightly scotchbrite the rear rotors. Very happy, much better feel then OEM ever felt. The front rotors were stained/glazed with pad material and rusted bad after 2 1/2 years 35K miles. All for under $150 in parts and I made sure to clean and grease all parts (something the dealer would never do) The OP did the right thing.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSCN0402.JPG (108.6 KB, 7 views)
VSurfn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 04:52 AM   #8
Site Team
 
AWDfreak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,940
My Vehicle: 2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek 5MT
Default

It is entirely possible to have brake pads that don't last even 10,000 miles... if you drive like me.

The brake pads appear to be a bit glazed. Do you ride the brakes on downhill grades? If so, that may be contributing to the glazed pad. And yes, one good panic stop at speed under severe conditions can indeed glaze the OEM pads. The Subaru OEM pads are actually great, but for most I would personally recommend running high quality pads such as Akebono brake pads with OEM rotors. Almost ALL brake rotors are made in China except for OEM brake rotors, hence the reason why I run Subaru OEM rotors.


Regarding rotors and pads, it is advised to turn (read: machine) the rotors when getting new brake pads as leaving the rotors with the pattern of the old pads may contribute to the "warped rotor" feeling. I personally prefer outright replacing brake rotors when I replace brake pads as the additional thermal capacity of new rotors is something I highly value.
__________________
"Why would I want to profess my feelings for some 3D girl?" - Tomoya Aki from the anime Saekano
AWDfreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2016, 03:36 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 20
My Vehicle: 2013 Subaru Crosstrek XV Premium (Tangerine Orange Pearl)
Default

Thanks for the replies everyone! I had to look up what glazed pads meant. My vehicular mechanical knowledge is very limited. I can definitely recall some hard brakes and steep downhill action. So.... mea culpa, I guess.

I agree, the pads do appear to still have a lot of meat on them. I called Subaru and asked them about this situation. They said early worn out brakes were likely caused by rusting from NOT driving the car that much. I suppose a garage would be preferable to keeping it out in the elements.

I will also look into zinc coated rotors next brake change. In the meantime I guess I have to drive more and be a bit more savvy with my car parts knowledge. :-)

I appreciate all of you taking the time to look at the photos and give me an assessment. Lots of good information here. Thank you!
solarwnz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2016, 08:30 AM   #10
Site Team
 
AWDfreak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,940
My Vehicle: 2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek 5MT
Default

Okay, I really gotta get this off my chest. This is not necessarily aimed at the OP, but it's something I will eventually add to a sticky.


Regarding downhill driving, you are supposed to use the paddle shifters to fully utilize engine braking. This will most definitely reduce the chances of glazed brake pads.

Do NOT be afraid of hearing the engine rev, it is designed to run between idle engine speed to nearly redline (the Subaru FB20 has an RPM operating range of 650-6600 RPM) given the engine is within normal operating temperature range.

With a Lineartronic CVT and most automatic-type transmissions, if your tires are the correct size, there is basically zero chance of over-revving the engine due to a bad downshift as the transmission computer is smart enough to recognize when the vehicle speed is too fast for a downshift to a particular gear ratio. It is IMPOSSIBLE to do damage with downshifting in an automatic-type transmission with proper tire size, so those with the Lineartronic CVT should not be afraid in the slightest of using their manual mode paddle shifting with correct tires.

You want to utilize the "gear" (CVT's don't actually use gears, gear in the context of this post is referring to the 6 preset gear ratios in the manual paddle shift mode) in the paddle shift mode that delivers the appropriate and/or desired engine braking. Using the lowest gear the transmission computer allows one to downshift to will maximize the engine braking. Upshifting to a higher gear will reduce engine braking if the lowest allowed gear has excessive engine braking for the situation at hand. Upshifting more than two gears from the lowest gear allowed by the transmission computer will nearly eliminate any engine braking.

I personally believe it is every driver's responsibility to properly utilize engine braking instead of unnecessarily and unsafely overheating one's brakes on the driven vehicle due to lack of knowledge. I'm sorry, but in my eyes, only naive drivers ride their brakes on a downhill grade, regardless of transmission type. I wish for all members to be less naive and more of an informed owner and driver, which in turn makes for more safe road users out on the road.

It does not matter what transmission you are driving (automatic, manual, CVT, single-clutch automatic, dual-clutch automatic), it is imperative drivers understand that riding the brakes endangers themselves as well as other road users.

Unnecessarily getting one's brakes hot on a downhill is dangerous, as a situation requiring emergency braking with warm and/or hot brakes will significantly increase stopping distances and reduce brake pedal response. The few or many feet that are increased due to hotter brakes can make the difference between being alive and startled to potentially in an accident because of such negligence.

Many people will reason out by saying things like "t wears out the transmission" or "it wears out the engine"... damn near every vehicle is designed to use engine braking. Please don't buy into the "it will wear [insert component name] out" mindset, as safety that saves lives trumps any kind of monetary saving that could be had thinking that way. What matters more, your transmission/engine/component, or the lives (including yours) that one may risk when riding the service brakes on a downhill grade.


However, if maximum engine braking proves to be too weak (due to circumstances such as very steel downhill, heavily loaded vehicle, etc), service brake use should be used on and off, rather than constantly.
Use of the service brakes in cycles (2-5 second cycles, or whatever interval you wish to use) and staying within a certain speed bracket (such as waiting for vehicle to speed up to 60 MPH with maximum engine braking, then using service braking to aid the engine braking to slow vehicle down to 55 or 50 MPH) will be far safer than riding ans using the service brakes alone.
__________________
"Why would I want to profess my feelings for some 3D girl?" - Tomoya Aki from the anime Saekano
AWDfreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.