Tire pressures - Club Crosstrek | Subaru XV Crosstrek Forums
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Old 11-05-2016, 03:01 PM   #1
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Default Tire pressures

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Originally Posted by AWDfreak View Post
It is absolutely imperative that owners/drivers maintain their main service tire pressures, tire wear... to fully prolong the AWD system's driveline components. As I have found out the hard way with my previous Subaru, the center differential can be surprisingly sensitive to slight differences many uninformed or new-to-Subaru drivers would deem acceptable.
Having read this in the Sticky (thank you AWDFreak), I went out to check my pressures. The door panel sticker says it should be 33F/32R but I get 36F/35R, cold parked overnite. That's nearly 10% higher than spec. I checked them three times with both analog and digital gauges.

My car's just 3 weeks new so I can only assume these are the pressures they sent me home from the dealer with. Does this sound like something to be concerned about?

I should also call back my sales guy & ask him about it too. But I was curious what the community here might think—am I overthinking this?

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Old 11-06-2016, 03:25 AM   #2
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I wouldn't get too concerned about it, but it is something to take note of, unless you drive an extremely high mileage commute (1000 miles a week or something usually high like that).


Your dealer did you better than the one I got mine from. Last I recall, when I got my XV Crosstrek new, the tire pressures where at or near the 50 PSI range...
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Old 11-29-2016, 10:54 PM   #3
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I've played around with pressures initially. The 33/32 is way too mushy. I had 37 set to all, but am running 36 which is a comfortable ride. I did check with my tire dealer, and they said it is fine. They said they like to run 40 usually, as the pressure will drop a certain amount as the temperature goes down. 37 was too hard of a ride. I've used the same tire center for years, and trust their advice. I'm also going to rotate every 6k. I would hold off on asking the sales guy much of anything, unless he is a diehard Subie guy. I would sooner talk with one of the master mechanics.


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Old 11-30-2016, 03:22 AM   #4
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I did ask my sales guy, and he left back a message that basically just said go with what's on the door sticker. Safe answer. So I went to 33/32 and haven't thought it felt "mushy" particularly, but if it's safe to go back to 36/35 I might just try that again. I've heard that will help prolong the life of the tire (True? False?) but more importantly then it has some room to drop as temps get colder and I'd rather they didn't drop below the sticker recommendations. Probably more important just to check pressures regularly and keep them consistent. Mine just turned over 3k this past weekend... halfway to the first oil change and rotation already.
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Old 11-30-2016, 02:16 PM   #5
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Yes. The reason they use higher pressure, is that it does prolong the life of the tire. My tire dealer also claims that whatever new car you have, they come from the factory with more of a performance tire. The rubber is softer and sticker. That's why they wear out quicker, usually between 20-30k, no matter if you rotate them and keep the pressure up. I always opt for something that will last longer when I replace them. They also recommend a higher pressure in the tire too. I ran 40 on my Mazda 3, and currently do on my Camry. I will keep any new tires at 36. The ride is comfortable. I'm also going to use an all season that has good ratings.


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Old 12-05-2016, 07:15 PM   #6
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Assuming you are using an accurate gauge, and the tires are the same size as OEM, then what is on the sticker is what your tires should be, within a pound or less. Note that tires are COLD when checked -- ie. the car has not been driven for several hours. You should get into the habit of checking tire pressure every couple of weeks -- this is how you adjust for changing seasons, NOT putting in extra pressure because 'it goes down over time or when it gets cold'.

Always check tire pressures yourself. Never assume dealers, garages, tire stores, or repairmen have any idea what they are doing.

Knowing what the tire pressures are normally (what's on the sticker) doesn't mean you can't adjust it for your own reasons. But adjustments come with consequences. Raising the pressure does not increase the life of the tire (in fact it just causes the center of the tread to wear faster), but it does decrease rolling resistance which will increase your mileage. It will also significantly decrease your traction (smaller footprint), increase wear on other suspension components now that the tires aren't doing their share of absorbing shock and, for the same reason, makes belt breakage on potholes or rocks and such more likely. Decreasing pressure (down to as low as 15 psi or so) hugely increases traction -- in snow or deep sand for example -- but also increases the possibilities for tirewall damage and tire damage from heat buildup if driven fast. You should only run very low pressures as long as the situation demands, then air up again.

So... best advice: keep pressures where the stickers say they should be and check them often, cold, with a quality gauge. Adjust pressures up or down for special situations, but be aware of the consequences.
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Old 12-05-2016, 11:58 PM   #7
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Of course you check them when cold, which obviously means you haven't driven the car for about 8 hours. That is a given. What the tire dealer I use said was, when the temperature goes down to about 35, you will get a reading about a pound lighter. You would ALWAYS still check your tires after the car has sat for about 8 hours no matter what the temperature is, and obviously use an accurate gauge. I'm not saying or implying that you should add excessive air to your tire, nor decrease them to 15. I think the ride is crappy with the recommended factory pressure and feels mushy. I keep mine at 36. I also check them every couple of weeks when they have sat overnight. My pressure is never off by much. I'm not advocating for increasing pressure excessively. I also rotate them every 6k. I don't think the majority of people do this. I have a comfortable ride, and get good wear out of my tires. From personal experience, and feedback from others dealers are not keeping pressure within a good range. I'm also only referencing our Treks with this. Other cars I own are not AWD. I wouldn't do anything to risk damage.


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Old 12-06-2016, 12:45 AM   #8
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Perhaps I did not use the "quick reply" correctly. I was responding to the OP with my opinion, not provoking an argument with other posters.
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Old 12-06-2016, 01:18 AM   #9
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Perhaps I need to lighten up a bit. This is after all a public forum for a group of like minded enthusiasts. My apologies. Also thanks to all for your feedback, knowledge and opinions.


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Old 12-06-2016, 08:37 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdshetler View Post
Assuming you are using an accurate gauge, and the tires are the same size as OEM, then what is on the sticker is what your tires should be, within a pound or less. Note that tires are COLD when checked -- ie. the car has not been driven for several hours. You should get into the habit of checking tire pressure every couple of weeks -- this is how you adjust for changing seasons, NOT putting in extra pressure because 'it goes down over time or when it gets cold'.

Always check tire pressures yourself. Never assume dealers, garages, tire stores, or repairmen have any idea what they are doing.

Knowing what the tire pressures are normally (what's on the sticker) doesn't mean you can't adjust it for your own reasons. But adjustments come with consequences. Raising the pressure does not increase the life of the tire (in fact it just causes the center of the tread to wear faster), but it does decrease rolling resistance which will increase your mileage. It will also significantly decrease your traction (smaller footprint), increase wear on other suspension components now that the tires aren't doing their share of absorbing shock and, for the same reason, makes belt breakage on potholes or rocks and such more likely. Decreasing pressure (down to as low as 15 psi or so) hugely increases traction -- in snow or deep sand for example -- but also increases the possibilities for tirewall damage and tire damage from heat buildup if driven fast. You should only run very low pressures as long as the situation demands, then air up again.

So... best advice: keep pressures where the stickers say they should be and check them often, cold, with a quality gauge. Adjust pressures up or down for special situations, but be aware of the consequences.
All very good advice


A lot of this is generally outlined in the "New to Subaru" sticky thread in the general maintenance forum subsection.

Subaru's specific definition for "cold tires" is the vehicle sitting for at least 3 hours and having been driven less than 1 mile within this 3 hour period.


Unfortunately, most automotive service shops and tire shops have incorrectly or neglected to properly inflate or adjust my specific Subaru XV Crosstrek's tire pressures. The only two places that have done so properly in my experience are my local independent Subaru shop and the dealership I purchased my Subaru from.

Aside from those exceptions, every single tire shop and automotive service facility have incorrectly overinflated or failed to properly adjust my Crosstrek's tire pressures. The overinflated tires are most common on brand-new vehicles and should be one of the first things a new Subaru owner should check.

As for correct inflation of tires on Crosstreks, the manual transmission models have different tire pressure specifications than automatic Lineartronic CVT models. Because I have a manual transmission, and most vehicles have automatic transmissions here in North America, the overwhelming majority of shops incorrectly fill my tires up to the CVT specifications when it is blatantly obvious my vehicle has the 5MT.
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