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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! do you have any brake maintenance tips for me? I just bought a second hand 2019 crosstrek 6 months ago. Any advise is good. Thanks.
 

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Tips for brake maintenance on all vehicles:
1) If you aren't comfortable doing brake maintenance, pay a reputable garage. They are arguably the most important safety feature on your vehicle and need to be done right.
2) Replace brake fluid every two years
3) If your OEM rotors need resurfaced try to find a place that will do it so you can keep them rather than replace. They are usually better than most basic aftermarket rotors.
4) If you have had you rotors resurfaced multiple times and it is time to replace them, see if you can find matched rotors and brake pads in a bundle. I have had really good luck with the higher end bundles from Powerstop.
5) Clean and grease your brake hardware properly and with care when you replace brakes. A Dremel tool with a wire brush attachment can be your best friend. If the hardware is rough, replace it.
6) Break-in/bedding procedures are important for fresh brakes. There are lot of methods and most people will argue that there way is best, but I usually follow the manufacturers recommendations. These do not usually come with the brakes, so you have to look them up online for most manufacturers. The idea is generally to heat up the brakes real good and then do some gradual stops without actually coming to a complete stop, and then let the brakes cool completely before ever coming to a complete stop. This is often done in cycles, and can be a challenge to do driving out on the roads unless you are fortunate enough to live in a rural area. I recommend finding a big empty parking lot at night.
7) The cheap soft brakes wear out a lot faster and tend to leave your wheels covered in brake dust all the time. The super long life semi-metallic brakes tend to chatter and make a lot of noise. I usually go with the upper end mid-grade while avoiding the extremely long life semi-metallics because I drive a lot of mountain descents at speed and can't stand the chatter.
8) Did I mention changing your fluid every 2 years? I did, but it's worth mentioning again. Brake fluid absorbs moisture and will rot your brake lines from the inside out. Every 2 years may be excessive for some especially in dryer climates, but you should try to do it at least every 3-5 years if you can't stomach the idea of doing it every other. (this is one of the most commonly ignored maintenance items I have seen).
9) A simple handheld vacuum bleeder makes bleeding brakes by yourself possible, so it is a worthwhile investment unless you really want to pull someone else in to press the peddle for you.
 

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I live in the mountains and I dont know anyone around here who changes their brake fluid every two years. It is a good idea, but seems to be the one thing most people dont do, and I havent come across any issues where brakes failed in this area due to bad brake fluid.
 

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It may be climate/road salt related or just bad luck on my part, but before I started changing my brake fluid regularly I was lucky to get a car further than 10 years into it's life before I had to replace some brake lines due to failure. Since I began flushing I have never had a single brake line rust out. Just one guys experience, but that experience and what ricklee stated "one thing most people don't do" are the reasons I stressed it as important. The vast majority of people don't do it, and most don't even know it is on their vehicles maintenance schedule. I do ignore a lot of things on maintenance scheduled, and let others run long, but when it comes to brakes I don't mess around. If you have never had the terrifying experience of pushing on your brake peddle and having it push very easily all the way to the floor of the car, I hope you never do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It may be climate/road salt related or just bad luck on my part, but before I started changing my brake fluid regularly I was lucky to get a car further than 10 years into it's life before I had to replace some brake lines due to failure. Since I began flushing I have never had a single brake line rust out. Just one guys experience, but that experience and what ricklee stated "one thing most people don't do" are the reasons I stressed it as important. The vast majority of people don't do it, and most don't even know it is on their vehicles maintenance schedule. I do ignore a lot of things on maintenance scheduled, and let others run long, but when it comes to brakes I don't mess around. If you have never had the terrifying experience of pushing on your brake peddle and having it push very easily all the way to the floor of the car, I hope you never do.
Is it ok to replace the old brake pads with ceramic brake pads?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I live in the mountains and I dont know anyone around here who changes their brake fluid every two years. It is a good idea, but seems to be the one thing most people dont do, and I havent come across any issues where brakes failed in this area due to bad brake fluid.
Aside from changing the brake fluids.

Do I need to replace the whole brake set? or just replace the rotors and brake pads?
 

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Aside from changing the brake fluids.

Do I need to replace the whole brake set? or just replace the rotors and brake pads?
In general I only replace the pads unless there is a problem with something else. Everything else just gets cleaned up. I do scuff my rotors with heavy sand paper if I am not having them resurfaced/cut.
 

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I change the rotors and pads at the same time, I like POWERSTOP performance and have had great results in changing them as a set. Nothing wrong just changing the pads if the rotors are in good shape, prefer the better braking performance of a better rotor then stock.
 
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