Subaru XV Crosstrek Forums banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2013 Crosstrek. All my oil changes have been done at Subaru dealerships. It's time for my 60k service. They quoted me $750. A big part is spark plugs. Is it a good idea to replace the spark plugs at this time? Would it be better/cheaper to have them replaced somewhere besides a Subaru dealership?

How about the 60k in general - what is the smart way to approach this?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,941 Posts
Yes, replace the spark plugs as it is what Subaru of America calls for in the service schedule.

I found myself a local Subaru specialty shop with a former Subaru dealership technician who is an ASE-certified Master Technician. There may be Subaru-specific auto shops in your area, but if you're still under a warranty or service contract, I would stick with the dealer.


Let me copy and paste my requested service when I got my 60k mile service done... here's an idea what it should look like:

* REPLACE - Engine oil replacement
* REPLACE - Engine oil filter replacement
* REPLACE - Spark Plug replacement, Subaru OEM spark plugs P/N 22401AA781 [QTY 4]
* INSPECT - Drive belt inspection
* INSPECT - Fuel systems, lines & connections inspection
* REPLACE - Engine Air Cleaner Element, Subaru OEM air cleaner element P/N 16546AA12A
* INSPECT - Cooling system, hoses, & connections inspection
* INSPECT - Clutch Operation inspection [Manual transmission only]
* REPLACE - Transmission gear oil replacement [Manual transmission only]
* REPLACE - Rear differential gear oil replacement
* INSPECT - Brake lines, operation of parking & service brake systems inspection
* REPLACE - Brake fluid / clutch fluid replacement [Clutch fluid for manual transmission only]
* INSPECT - Disc brake pad & disc, front & rear axle boots & joints inspection
* INSPECT - Steering & suspension inspection
* INSPECT - Wheel bearing inspection
* PERFORM - Rotate and inspect tires
* REPLACE - HVAC system A/C filter replacement, Subaru OEM air cleaner P/N 72880FG000
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I'm in a similar position, or should I say, I will be in a years time (2013 model - 3 year maintenance plan).

I've just had my 45 000km service and my maintenance plan will run out next month. After the recent service, I asked the Service Manager an approximate cost for the 60 000km service and was quoted +-$700.

In addition to the above list, they also flush the cooling system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Ouch! As much I am really liking my new Crosstrek, this is my first Subaru so I guess I should have scoped all this out before making my purchase. Didn't know the maintenance and oil changes would add up to so much. Hmmm. But it IS a nice car!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,941 Posts
Maintenance on newer vehicles is generally getting more expensive, but car maintenance in general has never been too cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
None of the things on the 60k maintenance list are remotely difficult to do yourself (I just did all of these on my '13 crosstrek, wouldn't think of letting a dealer touch it). $700? Looks like a good time to invest some of this money in some good tools if you don't have them and find a friend who will show you the ropes in exchange for a good dinner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Wow, i was taken aback to see that the plugs need changing at 60k miles. Im holding out until the 2018 hits showrooms. My current ride gets them changed out at 100,000.
I'm currently at 90,000k and no service exceeded about $400.00. I have read that Subies tend to be expensive to service. Is this due to frequency, labor rates or maybe both ?


Sent using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
It's due to complexity of build. Labor rates are higher. Also, Subaru is part of Fuji heavy industries, so many parts for them come from that company, that usually lessens the cost when parts are sold at cost from one corporation to another.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
In the grand scheme of things, the cost is minimal compared to that of other vehicles. I've also seen many people post about spending much more than this on so called "upgrades" that were optional. Luckily, my mechanic also owns a 16 Trek. I'll follow his lead. Most of these procedures aren't rocket science. I'm sure he can save me some money. We're talking about the appropriate cost of a new set of tires. That wouldn't have stopped me from purchasing the car.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
In the grand scheme of things, the cost is minimal compared to that of other vehicles. I've also seen many people post about spending much more than this on so called "upgrades" that were optional. Luckily, my mechanic also owns a 16 Trek. I'll follow his lead. Most of these procedures aren't rocket science. I'm sure he can save me some money. We're talking about the appropriate cost of a new set of tires. That wouldn't have stopped me from purchasing the car.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Purchasing add on's is discretionary income used to buy voluntary items that are optional. Maintenance cost outside of tires,shocks,struts,wipers and fluids are mandatory at some point in the life cycle. I still don't understand plugs at 60k miles. Not saying that is not required. Just wondering why other Japanese manufacturers vehicles can run 100k miles


Sent using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Keep in mind that if plugs do have 60k life span, at some point beyond that your mpg will suffer.


Sent using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Purchasing add on's is discretionary income used to buy voluntary items that are optional. Maintenance cost outside of tires,shocks,struts,wipers and fluids are mandatory at some point in the life cycle. I still don't understand plugs at 60k miles. Not saying that is not required. Just wondering why other Japanese manufacturers vehicles can run 100k miles


Sent using Tapatalk Pro
The Jeep Patriot has a 30k mile interval for spark plugs. The plugs for it are cheap and easy to change though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
The Jeep Patriot has a 30k mile interval for spark plugs. The plugs for it are cheap and easy to change though.


That makes sense. Our SUV has 100k intervals, are a pita (rear banks) to access and a little pricey. Thanks for the clarification Nanook.
Btw...is Nanook from Frank Zappa (-:


Sent using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
That makes sense. Our SUV has 100k intervals, are a pita (rear banks) to access and a little pricey. Thanks for the clarification Nanook.
Btw...is Nanook from Frank Zappa (-:


Sent using Tapatalk Pro
Becks,
Nanook is an old USMC nickname from one of my roommates. After football practice one day I threw my pads on the floor and proclaimed "the great white running back from the north has returned". The my roommate stood on his rack with his arms held high and yelled "Nanook!" He had taken it from the book the great white hunter from the north.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
It's due to complexity of build. Labor rates are higher.
Since our Crosstrek plugs are pita to get at, I'd be strongly tempted to upgrade the plugs themselves when the time comes. I switched to Iridium plugs on my bikes and they're supposed to last 100k. So if the recommended interval for our Subaru plugs is 60k, and that's based on the expected life span of the plug itself, why not spend the extra couple bucks per plug to get almost double the life and therefore save a plug change interval or two?
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top