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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took about 15 minutes a side. Rotated front to back and back to front without any "X" per owners' manual and double checked with dealer. One interesting note. I was able to use a single lift point with floor jack to lift entire side of XV. This frame is rigid and well constructed. Normally, I have to use a jack stand at lift point then move floor jack to next spot. There is barely any sag using front lift spot! Both wheels on the side jacked came off the ground without having to jack up to a increased, unsafe elevation. I was pleasantly surprised by this. Normally, as you know, when you pump up one spot the vehicle sags on the other 3 corners leaving tires on the ground.

Torqued lugs to 89 lbs and job done. Of note: everything on suspension with tire removed looked quite easy to access and work on if you haven't had a chance or reason to look yet. Very straightforward and manageable if you like to do these sort of things. : :D. Oh, almost forgot-17" tire/wheel combo is light compared to others I ve done and rim design lends itself to having easy lift points. Good for the back!
 

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Good to know. Next time snap some photos for us :)
 

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I will stick to my rotation cycle that I have used for years.

Every 3000-4000 miles. The tires wear more evenly on all my vehicles at this interval.


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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Manual says 7500 miles. Xtrekr has a strong point though - better for tire wear and half shafts can wear prematurely if tires are not close to the same spec all the way around and this is ensured by frequent and regular rotation. It IS very simple and is one of those things that a mechanical novice can do to get to know their vehicle and begin to understand its engineering. I use a Pittsburgh brand 3 ton floor jack that I bought at Harbor Freight for $79 on sale. I also use a torque wrench that you can find anywhere for under $20. Again, mine is a Pittsburgh from HF and cost $9 bucks. You don't have to have a torque wrench though. Lugs are pretty tough and you can just snug them up tight. Either way, it's just good practice to recheck that they are tight after a few hundred miles.
 

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RubySu said:
Manual says 7500 miles. Xtrekr has a strong point though - better for tire wear and half shafts can wear prematurely if tires are not close to the same spec all the way around and this is ensured by frequent and regular rotation. It IS very simple and is one of those things that a mechanical novice can do to get to know their vehicle and begin to understand its engineering. I use a Pittsburgh brand 3 ton floor jack that I bought at Harbor Freight for $79 on sale. I also use a torque wrench that you can find anywhere for under $20. Again, mine is a Pittsburgh from HF and cost $9 bucks. You don't have to have a torque wrench though. Lugs are pretty tough and you can just snug them up tight. Either way, it's just good practice to recheck that they are tight after a few hundred miles.
Good info. I've never rotated my own but I am going to look into it.
 

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Rotating tires is a piece of cake and a good way to get started on doing some of the things you would normally pay others to do. This gives you an opportunity to look at the brakes as well.


If you never changed a wheel, I guess one would wait for the nice squealing sound of the wear bar indicators ( some models ) before something would have to be done.... With a normal tire rotation, you can visually inspect the wear on your brake pads... all you need is a reference point ( a pic of a new pad ) to allow you to make an intelligent decision on how good or bad your brake pads are BEFORE it becomes an issue.


Example to ponder:


Say you notice a drive-ability issue ( pulling hard to one side when braking ), you would now have the knowledge of how even your pads should be and may be able to tell ( just by looking at the wear of your pads ) which wheel is giving you grief. Now this MAY point you in the right direction... keep that in mind.. just giving a simple scenario...


This is just a small toe dipped into the ocean of basic vehicle maintenance, but you get the picture.
 
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