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Could someone quickly explain to me like i'm an idiot what the difference between a gas engine and a diesel engine are? i know the brits have a turbo diesel XV and that diesel is MUCH more popular over there, but is there a reason why? would diesel be something that I want? it's more expensive than gas so I am just curious.
 

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There are good and BAD things about the TDI, I should know ... I drive one
The good is of course fuel economy, and the bad being its maintenance and parts
being its a VW, because thus far there had been some oddball issues with some TDI
such as fuel pump failures and what not causing massive repair bills.

My TDI is so far so good, but still the Subaru XV Crosstrek is a more ideal choice
even tho its NOT a diesel.
 

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mrzcai415 said:
There are good and BAD things about the TDI, I should know ... I drive one
The good is of course fuel economy, and the bad being its maintenance and parts
being its a VW, because thus far there had been some oddball issues with some TDI
such as fuel pump failures and what not causing massive repair bills.

My TDI is so far so good, but still the Subaru XV Crosstrek is a more ideal choice
even tho its NOT a diesel.
interesting. i've never been a big VW fan and always thought they weren't too mechanically sound (though my friend has a 2012 GTi that is a blast to drive). i wonder if your issues are common diesel issues or just TDI issues?

with what you know now, would you buy a diessel Crosstrek if Subaru released one in the US? (let's assume it was same price as the gas engine)
 

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atomic_subaru said:
with what you know now, would you buy a diessel Crosstrek if Subaru released one in the US? (let's assume it was same price as the gas engine)
I second this question! I have never owned a diesel vehicle but I am really interested in the Crosstrek diesel they have over seas. All of the reviews say it is a blast to drive.
 

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Would I want to buy a DIESEL vehicle in America for the XV ... thats a tricky question
YES ! , because of the massive LOW END torque a Turbo Diesel produces will work to the XV's charateristics
NO ! ... because of the limited network of fueling stations with DIESEL ( aside from truck stops, because I primary fuel up along trucking routes)

And ohh yeah forgot to add a DIESEL version would UP the fuel economy considerably...
for the XV I think it can at least do 40HWY and 30 city if its a DIESEL

Because real world numbers are different.. for example I average 35mpgs in my TDI and I drive mostly city,
but for trips where I am mostly on the motorway(freeway) I average up to 45mpgs at 65mph
 

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mrzcai415 said:
Would I want to buy a DIESEL vehicle in America for the XV ... thats a tricky question
YES ! , because of the massive LOW END torque a Turbo Diesel produces will work to the XV's charateristics
NO ! ... because of the limited network of fueling stations with DIESEL ( aside from truck stops, because I primary fuel up along trucking routes)

And ohh yeah forgot to add a DIESEL version would UP the fuel economy considerably...
for the XV I think it can at least do 40HWY and 30 city if its a DIESEL

Because real world numbers are different.. for example I average 35mpgs in my TDI and I drive mostly city,
but for trips where I am mostly on the motorway(freeway) I average up to 45mpgs at 65mph
What part of the country are you in? I feel like diesel is at basically all of the gas stations I stop at now in Southern California. I am also from/spend a lot of time in Eastern NC and I feel diesel is just as plentiful. Maybe it's because I haven't ever really HAD to look for it.

Even so, though, I think the added fuel economy and the low end torque would be more than worth searching a little more for a diesel station.
 

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ohh me, I am up in San Francisco so I have to go around El Camino area (trucking routes ) for DIESEL
because most stations does not have it up here... aside from BIODIESEL which is a whole different story
but my new VW TDI for whatever the reason is NOT suppose to take B100 but can only do B5.

But yeah, maybe its just because I happen to own a VW, maybe SUBARU's TDI system will be simple
(but at of right now no Japanese automaker offers the DIESEL option in the USA )
 

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i had a diesel truck once. yes, diesel was a little harder to find but it wasn't that bad. i would gladly take a diesel Crosstrek but i guess it's too late for that since i ordered mine already :p
 

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Diesel engines tend to have less horsepower than their gasoline-engine counterparts. They also tend to rev less, with a lower redline. However, diesel engines have more torque output than their gasoline engine counterparts thanks to the longer stroke and the high energy content of diesel fuel. Of course, this is all relative in general, but I hope it helps clarify things.

I genuinely wished Subaru would bring in the Subaru BOXER Diesel in North America. The turbocharged engine with a diesel setup, boxer engine, and 6-speed manual just seems like a lot of fun, but unfortunately, the environmental politicians (or something I'm not so sure about) seem to dislike the trend of passenger car clean diesels...
 

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Thelosis said:
Aren't diesels pretty clean nowadays?
Very much. It shouldn't be much of a surprise if the diesel-engine counterpart of a vehicle has cleaner emissions than its gasoline-engine counterpart, thanks largely in part due to exhaust cleaning technologies such as particulate filters.
 

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Diesel definitely burns cleaner than gasoline from everything i've heard. I used to work at a shop (NOT a mechanic by any means, i just helped run the front desk) and I always heard nothing but good things about diesel. I know that's not "hard facts" but it's still pretty convincing.
 

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PhilForce said:
A good article can be found here if you want to read a lot about it: http://www.howstuffworks.com/diesel1.htm

Hopefully someone can who knows more about it can break it down to simpler terms.
I don't know if I can but I'll try...
Having been a diesel technician for going on ten years, diesel technology is something I enjoy talking about.
If you read the link above you know now that diesels and gasoline engines are similar in design. They all rely on the same theory...internal combustion driving a piston, which turns a crankshaft. What's different between the two is how they create that combustion.
Simply put, combustion is fire. Fire relies on three things in order to exist. Heat, oxygen, and fuel. The two engine designs are similar in the oxygen and fuel categories in that, both rely on intake valves of some sort, and both rely on injectors or some other way of introducing a fuel source into the cylinder above the piston.
The last element, heat, is where the two engines vary differently. Gasoline engines use a spark plug, obviously, but Diesel engines use heat from compression. A Diesel piston will compress the air in a cylinder sometimes 20:1 which causes an immense amount of heat, enough to ignite the fuel injected into the cylinder.
After this the theories of the two engines are back to being the same and the cycle starts over again.
Trust me I could go on and on and on about fuel system theories and such but it would probably take all night.
Basically, to try to put it as concise as possible, higher fuel pressures mean smaller atomization of fuel as it enters the cylinder. Smaller "drops" of fuel means more complete burn of the fuel before it's shoved out the exhaust. A more complete burn means much cleaner emissions, better fuel economy, and more power.

I hope this helps and I haven't muddied the waters even more. I tried not to repeat the link above too much.

Any questions let me know!




Seth
 

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Great explanation, Seth. I grew up learning to drive on early 80's VW diesels (dad and I did a complete rebuild on his '82 Jetta when I was 10) and my first vehicle was an F250 diesel. I love the long term reliability, torque, and mileage that they offer. If Subaru got us the boxer diesel over here, I'd buy one in a heartbeat.
 

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sail114 said:
Great explanation, Seth. I grew up learning to drive on early 80's VW diesels (dad and I did a complete rebuild on his '82 Jetta when I was 10) and my first vehicle was an F250 diesel. I love the long term reliability, torque, and mileage that they offer. If Subaru got us the boxer diesel over here, I'd buy one in a heartbeat.
Thanks Sail!
I couldn't agree more!



Seth
 

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I maybe way out in left field on this but I believe the diesel Subaru's in Europe are all manual shift
vehicles, and for some reason the tecknowledgey to make diesels for automatics would not be cost effective to bring over to the States (as the majority of vehicles sold here are automatic)
Don't know if it is because of the boxer engine or other Uniqueness that Subaru has with their engine/transmission.
Sorry if I got to technical ;D ;D
 
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