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Discussion Starter #1
Looking into getting some snow cables for my XV as sometimes it's mandated by law enforcement that you carry them through some of the mountain passes. I realize the owners manual says not to use chains, but that an "S" class traction device is suitable during emergencies. Anybody got a recommendation?
 

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My personal recommendation is to purchase tires that are severe-snow/winter rated. But as you noted, Subaru does NOT recommend chain or traction devices due to possible tire clearance issues.

What some Subaru owners that take their Subaru off-roading, they use all-terrain tires that are also severe-snow/winter rated.

http://blog.tirerack.com/blog/chads-742-on-performance-tires-and-wheels/all-terrain-tires-with-mountainsnowflake-symbol

This way, you won't have to have special winter wheels and tires, and will rely less on a traction device.
I would only do that though if you go off-roading quite a bit and REALLY need the winter driving capability. Because surely, it'll affect the XV's pavement handling, though improve off-pavement and severe-weather handling.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't do enough winter driving in California to warrant purchasing snow tires, but the law requires you to carry chains or other traction devices when crossing certain mountain passes.
 

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Moonray13 said:
I don't do enough winter driving in California to warrant purchasing snow tires, but the law requires you to carry chains or other traction devices when crossing certain mountain passes.
Where in California? Up in Big Bear they sometimes require chains OR AWD/4WD, but not both (to my knowledge), though the snow there doesn't compare to up north like in Mammoth. I'm not doubting you, just curious.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Either taking the 5 North above Redding toward Oregon, or the 8 East toward Reno. Happens all the time when the snow is heavy.
 

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Moonray13 said:
Either taking the 5 North above Redding toward Oregon, or the 8 East toward Reno. Happens all the time when the snow is heavy.
Yeah, I figured you were more north, definitely a ton of snow up there. As far as a chain recommendation goes, I wish I had one, but I've never used them before.

I do have a question, though. If chains are required on an AWD vehicle, do you just put them on the front wheels, or do you have to do all four?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
On 2WD cars, you put them on the drive wheels. On AWD, I think you just put them on the front.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Not yet, although there are quite a few choices in the "S" type category. It's not a big priority for me as I don't have immediate plans to head for Lake Tahoe, but I'll have to make a decision or risk putting off any plans to see the snow this winter.
 

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ClubCrosstrek said:
Moonray13 said:
On 2WD cars, you put them on the drive wheels. On AWD, I think you just put them on the front.
Copy that. Any luck finding an answer for good chains to use? I'm sure others as well as myself would like to hear what you end up choosing.
New here, same question. I've been researching and SCC Super Z6 cables are supposed to exceed class S specs for clearance, size SZ139 for 225/55-17. Has anyone tried these cables? I'm about to get some via vulcan tire sales for emergencies/chp requirements...
 

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Well snow cable is not a bad idea atleast its better then chains because chains have more harmful effects then chain. But the snow tires is the best thing which you can buy because they have better grip on the snow and sleepy roads.


Thule Roof Racks
 

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I may not worry so much about snow/ice performance. The XV did pretty well on ice up in Mammoth this weekend on a shakedown trip. The VSC light went off a few times but the car stayed under control. I'll have to see what it's like in thicker snow...

FYI, this is from the california DOT website:
TYPES OF CHAIN CONTROLS:
During the winter months, motorists may encounter traction chain controls in the mountain areas within California. When chain controls are established, signs will be posted along the road indicating the type of requirement. There are three requirements in California.

Requirement One (R1): Chains, traction devices or snow tires are required on the drive axle of all vehicles except four wheel/ all wheel drive vehicles.

Requirement Two (R2): Chains or traction devices are required on all vehicles except four wheel/ all wheel drive vehicles with snow-tread tires on all four wheels.
(NOTE: Four wheel/all wheel drive vehicles must carry traction devices in chain control areas.)

Requirement Three (R3): Chains or traction devices are required on all vehicles, no exceptions.

SNOW-TREAD TIRES:
The California vehicle code section 558 defines a snow-tread tire as follows, " A 'Snow-tread tire' is a tire which has a relatively deep and aggressive tread pattern compared with conventional passenger tread pattern". Snow-tread tires can be identified by examining the sidewall of the tire where the letters MS, M/S, M+S or the words MUD AND SNOW have been stamped into the sidewall.

Tire Traction Devices:
The California vehicle code section 605 defines tire traction devices as follows: " Tire Traction Devices are devices or mechanisms having a composition and design capable of improving vehicle traction, braking and cornering ability upon snow or ice-covered surfaces. Tire traction devices shall be constructed and assembled to provide sufficient structural integrity and to prevent accidental detachment from vehicles. Tire traction devices shall, at the time of manufacture or final assembly, bear a permanent impression indicating the name, initials or trademark of the assembling company or primary manufacturer, and the country in which the devices were manufactured or assembled in final form."

If you would like to view a full version of the California Vehicle Code it can be located at the following location, under California Law: http//www.leginfo.ca.gov
 

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(R2) Requirement two: ...four wheel/ all wheel drive vehicles with snow-tread tires on all four wheels.
This is why I recommend an all-terrain tire with a winter rating

http://tires.tirerack.com/tires/All%20Terrain%20With%20Snowflake

http://blog.tirerack.com/blog/choose-the-best-tires-with-zig/severe-snow-rated-on-off-road-all-terrain-tires


But I was browsing some off-road products, and I found these! They're rubber traction devices, and would likely reduce the risk of damage compared to metal chains and cables.

http://flextrax.com/



GoClaws require more clearance but are useable for off-road use.
SnowClaws are designed for low-clearance passenger cars and are designed exclusively for highway use only (avoid off-roading with the SnowClaws!)

differences between GoClaws and SnowClaws explained
http://flextrax.com/mycustompage0015.htm
 

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AWDfreak said:
(R2) Requirement two: ...four wheel/ all wheel drive vehicles with snow-tread tires on all four wheels.
This is why I recommend an all-terrain tire with a winter rating

http://tires.tirerack.com/tires/All%20Terrain%20With%20Snowflake

http://blog.tirerack.com/blog/choose-the-best-tires-with-zig/severe-snow-rated-on-off-road-all-terrain-tires


But I was browsing some off-road products, and I found these! They're rubber traction devices, and would likely reduce the risk of damage compared to metal chains and cables.

http://flextrax.com/



GoClaws require more clearance but are useable for off-road use.
SnowClaws are designed for low-clearance passenger cars and are designed exclusively for highway use only (avoid off-roading with the SnowClaws!)

differences between GoClaws and SnowClaws explained
http://flextrax.com/mycustompage0015.htm
Whoa, those are pretty cool! I would like to hear from users how they actually preform.

HikingDrew said:
I may not worry so much about snow/ice performance. The XV did pretty well on ice up in Mammoth this weekend on a shakedown trip. The VSC light went off a few times but the car stayed under control. I'll have to see what it's like in thicker snow...
That is good to hear. I am really hoping I have time to even make it up to Big Bear this winter, let alone Mammoth.
 

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I live in Reno and travel I80 over Donner Pass at least twice a month. Until now, I have always taken my Wrangler TJ in severe weather during the winter months.

I ran M and S rated tires on our Jetta just in case we took it over. I carried snow cables

I don't think I will ever need traction devices on my XV, but would be nice to have them.

I am looking at these:

http://www.meijer.com/s/heininger-snow-donuts-standard-tire-anti-skid-chain-alternative-pair/_/R-211551?CAWELAID=1255471577&cagpspn=pla&cmpid=Google-G_US_Meijer_eCom_PLA_Home_Improvement&kpid=9100



Seems easy enough and no metal to worry about to damage your XV

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_67hY6e4Oi4
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The donuts look interesting, although I'm not sure I understand how they work if it's just fabric.
 

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There are a few companies that make them. They actually grip the tire as they roll and the outside of material has rubber nubbies that grip the snow


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