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Yep, what everybody else has said, DGM here and it sucks. That and interior gets permanent marks so freakin' easily it is ridiculous. I traded in a 2006 CRV that was in better shape with 137K than the XV with 25K. I have an 07 Avalanche with 100K and it is in better shape, too. My first and last Subaru.
YIKES....that's a pretty harsh rebuke! I'm on my 2nd Subaru, and in another 1.5-2 yrs, I'll trade her in for my 3rd. Yes the sh*t paint is FREAKING ANNOYING AS HELL! (I don't understand your interior issues. I throw my mountain bikes, dogs, etc in there all of the time. No bigger/worse issues than the other vehicles we own.)
What's GREAT about a Subaru far outweighs its negatives. It's absolutely one of the most versatile vehicles out there. We also have a 2015 Escalade, and a 2014 Nissan Frontier. Both of these are no where near as good in bad Winter weather. You would think the Caddy Escalade would have been fine. Nope. Kept getting stuck in snow and mud. When I would take out one of our Subarus? NEVER got stuck. As a matter of fact I look for roads and hills that look non-passable for fun. :)
So if you solely bought your Subaru based on looks alone, then you're right. This should be your last Subaru. But there so many better things to a Subaru than just its appearance!
Listen, I'm a HUGELY critical/judgemental person. I call people and products out for their sh*t all of the time. But give your Subaru a chance!! You may be pleasantly surprised! Good luck!
-Keith
 

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YIKES....that's a pretty harsh rebuke! I'm on my 2nd Subaru, and in another 1.5-2 yrs, I'll trade her in for my 3rd. Yes the sh*t paint is FREAKING ANNOYING AS HELL! (I don't understand your interior issues. I throw my mountain bikes, dogs, etc in there all of the time. No bigger/worse issues than the other vehicles we own.)
What's GREAT about a Subaru far outweighs its negatives. It's absolutely one of the most versatile vehicles out there. We also have a 2015 Escalade, and a 2014 Nissan Frontier. Both of these are no where near as good in bad Winter weather. You would think the Caddy Escalade would have been fine. Nope. Kept getting stuck in snow and mud. When I would take out one of our Subarus? NEVER got stuck. As a matter of fact I look for roads and hills that look non-passable for fun. :)
So if you solely bought your Subaru based on looks alone, then you're right. This should be your last Subaru. But there so many better things to a Subaru than just its appearance!
Listen, I'm a HUGELY critical/judgemental person. I call people and products out for their sh*t all of the time. But give your Subaru a chance!! You may be pleasantly surprised! Good luck!
-Keith
Well I'll probably get bashed for this, too, but I'm not overly impressed with the XV in the snow either. I watched all the Subaru videos on youtube showing controlled tests that it if I were on a slide with glycol running down it I would be in better shape if I were in a Subaru, but real world, nope. My Tahoe, Avalanche, CR-V, and Bravada, in that order, all felt better in the snow. The XV may be fun to throw around a parking lot with no lightposts, but I want the car to go exactly where I point it in the snow (when driving cautiously), not where it wants to go or after a 2-second delay (steering snow plow is horrible). Now to be fair I didn't get any real snow after my Rial wheels with Blizzaks, but the stockers scared me enough to do the 2 sets of wheels routine. I honestly think there is a little hype around the Subaru name. They have cashed in on their history and are now letting their customers down to make more $.
 

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I think part of the paint fragility has to do with color. I have the Dark Metallic Gray and while it is beautiful, if you even fart on this paint, it will chip.



I've read that all manufacturers have issues with this but I really don't see any reason for it. We now have cars that drive themselves. Can it be so difficult to paint a vehicle so that it doesn't chip as easily?


I work in a bodyshop as a painter and have been doing so for over 15 years. I have done collision repair work on new cars and now specialize in custom paint. All new cars are what is called a base coat/ clearcoat finish. The base coat is your color and the clear is what makes it shine and protects the color and metal surface. As in all other businesses, car companies are always looking to save money. A very easy way to do so is to cut down on the amount of materials used. If they cut out a pint or quart of color per car, that ends up being millions of dollars in savings. Because of this, colors don't look as good, you can usually see what we call blotch, which is the uneven spotty appearance of the color, and if you look throughout your car you will find many areas that don't even have color on them. Usually door jambs by the hinges and under hood areas, trunk areas very known for this. Most companies now use a tinted primer that is similar to the color of the car, therefore even less color on the car now. Then we get to the clearcoat. The more clearcoat you have (within proper manufacture specs). The better durability and appearance you will have. Less clear, less durability, less shine. Also there are different types of clear out there that the car manufacturers use. GM uses what is called a ceramic clear that is very hard and extremely durable. If we don't put this back on when doing a repair, it can actually void the warranty on the body. Most car companies don't use this clear. Higher end cars like Mercedes, bmw, Porsche all use this clear. GM is the only domestic company unknown of that uses this clear. As far as the quality of the paint it self goes, almost all companies use either PPG or BASF paint when building the cars. PPG is the best in the US and BASF/Glasurit is king in the European market. It all comes down to not having enough material on the vehicles. Next time you see a silver car, really stare at the paint and see how bad it really does look. You can see ought through it. His is also why you have so much orange peel it rough texture of the clearcoat on cars. Less material, means it doesn't flow as much. Paint nowadays is the best ever made hands down for durability, appearance and for the environment. It just needs to be used correctly. If manufacturers start putting more material on, then the paint Would hold up better but the cost of the cars will go up much higher. If anyone else has questions regarding paint, I would be more then happy to answer them. Also one other note. Someone mentioned putting a good wax on the car when you get it. This is kind of a touchy area. Your not supposed to apply wax over fresh paint for 6 months after application. This allows the solvents from the painting process to fully escape from the finish, allowing the paint to properly cure and harden. If you apply the wax to soon, it locks the solvents in the paint and prevents the paint from curing properly and can lead to paint problems. Everything from chipping easy, scratching easy, delamming (pealing) etc. when you get your new car, look on the tag in the door jamb. It has a manufacture date for your car which is written as a month then year (ex 01/16). Wait till 6 months after this to wax it. You can use a polish on it up to that point. Polish is mush different then wax. Same applies if you get bodywork done on your car, wait till 6 months after the repairs are made to wax and panels that were painted.


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Three years into owning our XV and I've noticed that behind all the door handles are tons of scratches from our finger nails. Really? The paint on my 2001 outback has fared better...and that includes 4+ years of not garaging it (in Oklahoma and then Germany).

I swear I just look at the XV and it scratches.
 

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YIKES....that's a pretty harsh rebuke! I'm on my 2nd Subaru, and in another 1.5-2 yrs, I'll trade her in for my 3rd. Yes the sh*t paint is FREAKING ANNOYING AS HELL! (I don't understand your interior issues. I throw my mountain bikes, dogs, etc in there all of the time. No bigger/worse issues than the other vehicles we own.)
What's GREAT about a Subaru far outweighs its negatives. It's absolutely one of the most versatile vehicles out there. We also have a 2015 Escalade, and a 2014 Nissan Frontier. Both of these are no where near as good in bad Winter weather. You would think the Caddy Escalade would have been fine. Nope. Kept getting stuck in snow and mud. When I would take out one of our Subarus? NEVER got stuck. As a matter of fact I look for roads and hills that look non-passable for fun. :)
So if you solely bought your Subaru based on looks alone, then you're right. This should be your last Subaru. But there so many better things to a Subaru than just its appearance!
Listen, I'm a HUGELY critical/judgemental person. I call people and products out for their sh*t all of the time. But give your Subaru a chance!! You may be pleasantly surprised! Good luck!
-Keith
I love my Subaru, but the amount of paint chips for my two year old car is quite surprising to me...

But, as you've stated, the safety engineering as well as being the ONLY mechanically-controlled AWD system available with a manual transmission for the subcompact crossovers it competes with (despite being a compact) truly make it a unique choice.

I work in a bodyshop as a painter and have been doing so for over 15 years. I have done collision repair work on new cars and now specialize in custom paint. All new cars are what is called a base coat/ clearcoat finish. The base coat is your color and the clear is what makes it shine and protects the color and metal surface. As in all other businesses, car companies are always looking to save money. A very easy way to do so is to cut down on the amount of materials used. If they cut out a pint or quart of color per car, that ends up being millions of dollars in savings. Because of this, colors don't look as good, you can usually see what we call blotch, which is the uneven spotty appearance of the color, and if you look throughout your car you will find many areas that don't even have color on them. Usually door jambs by the hinges and under hood areas, trunk areas very known for this. Most companies now use a tinted primer that is similar to the color of the car, therefore even less color on the car now. Then we get to the clearcoat. The more clearcoat you have (within proper manufacture specs). The better durability and appearance you will have. Less clear, less durability, less shine. Also there are different types of clear out there that the car manufacturers use. GM uses what is called a ceramic clear that is very hard and extremely durable. If we don't put this back on when doing a repair, it can actually void the warranty on the body. Most car companies don't use this clear. Higher end cars like Mercedes, bmw, Porsche all use this clear. GM is the only domestic company unknown of that uses this clear. As far as the quality of the paint it self goes, almost all companies use either PPG or BASF paint when building the cars. PPG is the best in the US and BASF/Glasurit is king in the European market. It all comes down to not having enough material on the vehicles. Next time you see a silver car, really stare at the paint and see how bad it really does look. You can see ought through it. His is also why you have so much orange peel it rough texture of the clearcoat on cars. Less material, means it doesn't flow as much. Paint nowadays is the best ever made hands down for durability, appearance and for the environment. It just needs to be used correctly. If manufacturers start putting more material on, then the paint Would hold up better but the cost of the cars will go up much higher. If anyone else has questions regarding paint, I would be more then happy to answer them. Also one other note. Someone mentioned putting a good wax on the car when you get it. This is kind of a touchy area. Your not supposed to apply wax over fresh paint for 6 months after application. This allows the solvents from the painting process to fully escape from the finish, allowing the paint to properly cure and harden. If you apply the wax to soon, it locks the solvents in the paint and prevents the paint from curing properly and can lead to paint problems. Everything from chipping easy, scratching easy, delamming (pealing) etc. when you get your new car, look on the tag in the door jamb. It has a manufacture date for your car which is written as a month then year (ex 01/16). Wait till 6 months after this to wax it. You can use a polish on it up to that point. Polish is mush different then wax. Same applies if you get bodywork done on your car, wait till 6 months after the repairs are made to wax and panels that were painted.


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Holy hell you really seem to know your stuff :eek:


I may very well sticky this thread (or your post, with your permission) with such great info.

Three years into owning our XV and I've noticed that behind all the door handles are tons of scratches from our finger nails. Really? The paint on my 2001 outback has fared better...and that includes 4+ years of not garaging it (in Oklahoma and then Germany).

I swear I just look at the XV and it scratches.
I've had older Subies (and have one), my 1999 Outback and 2000 Outback both had more-resilient paint than these newer models. But, I still manage to scratch the hell out of both (thanks off-road use).
 

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I love my Subaru, but the amount of paint chips for my two year old car is quite surprising to me...



But, as you've stated, the safety engineering as well as being the ONLY mechanically-controlled AWD system available with a manual transmission for the subcompact crossovers it competes with (despite being a compact) truly make it a unique choice.







Holy hell you really seem to know your stuff :eek:





I may very well sticky this thread (or your post, with your permission) with such great info.







I've had older Subies (and have one), my 1999 Outback and 2000 Outback both had more-resilient paint than these newer models. But, I still manage to scratch the hell out of both (thanks off-road use).


. Not a problem. Like I said any other questions about paint or body I'm more then happy to help.


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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Thanks for replying with great info. Like many others, I really like my Crosstrek. When Subaru sent me the (one of those surveys) survey I mentioned that the poor paint quality would factor into my next purchase decision. Yes, they must do better. If they aren't going to try, then don't send me a survey.

I WANT to like the Crosstrek even more, however the paint quality is not acceptable. Maybe next time I try a different color. That hyper blue is growing on me.





I work in a bodyshop as a painter and have been doing so for over 15 years. I have done collision repair work on new cars and now specialize in custom paint. All new cars are what is called a base coat/ clearcoat finish. The base coat is your color and the clear is what makes it shine and protects the color and metal surface. As in all other businesses, car companies are always looking to save money. A very easy way to do so is to cut down on the amount of materials used. If they cut out a pint or quart of color per car, that ends up being millions of dollars in savings. Because of this, colors don't look as good, you can usually see what we call blotch, which is the uneven spotty appearance of the color, and if you look throughout your car you will find many areas that don't even have color on them. Usually door jambs by the hinges and under hood areas, trunk areas very known for this. Most companies now use a tinted primer that is similar to the color of the car, therefore even less color on the car now. Then we get to the clearcoat. The more clearcoat you have (within proper manufacture specs). The better durability and appearance you will have. Less clear, less durability, less shine. Also there are different types of clear out there that the car manufacturers use. GM uses what is called a ceramic clear that is very hard and extremely durable. If we don't put this back on when doing a repair, it can actually void the warranty on the body. Most car companies don't use this clear. Higher end cars like Mercedes, bmw, Porsche all use this clear. GM is the only domestic company unknown of that uses this clear. As far as the quality of the paint it self goes, almost all companies use either PPG or BASF paint when building the cars. PPG is the best in the US and BASF/Glasurit is king in the European market. It all comes down to not having enough material on the vehicles. Next time you see a silver car, really stare at the paint and see how bad it really does look. You can see ought through it. His is also why you have so much orange peel it rough texture of the clearcoat on cars. Less material, means it doesn't flow as much. Paint nowadays is the best ever made hands down for durability, appearance and for the environment. It just needs to be used correctly. If manufacturers start putting more material on, then the paint Would hold up better but the cost of the cars will go up much higher. If anyone else has questions regarding paint, I would be more then happy to answer them. Also one other note. Someone mentioned putting a good wax on the car when you get it. This is kind of a touchy area. Your not supposed to apply wax over fresh paint for 6 months after application. This allows the solvents from the painting process to fully escape from the finish, allowing the paint to properly cure and harden. If you apply the wax to soon, it locks the solvents in the paint and prevents the paint from curing properly and can lead to paint problems. Everything from chipping easy, scratching easy, delamming (pealing) etc. when you get your new car, look on the tag in the door jamb. It has a manufacture date for your car which is written as a month then year (ex 01/16). Wait till 6 months after this to wax it. You can use a polish on it up to that point. Polish is mush different then wax. Same applies if you get bodywork done on your car, wait till 6 months after the repairs are made to wax and panels that were painted.


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Three years into owning our XV and I've noticed that behind all the door handles are tons of scratches from our finger nails. Really? The paint on my 2001 outback has fared better...and that includes 4+ years of not garaging it (in Oklahoma and then Germany).

I swear I just look at the XV and it scratches.


I bought some Cupeez for the doors and they've remained in place for close on 3 years.

http://cupeezforcars.com/



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Well I'll probably get bashed for this, too, but I'm not overly impressed with the XV in the snow either. I watched all the Subaru videos on youtube showing controlled tests that it if I were on a slide with glycol running down it I would be in better shape if I were in a Subaru, but real world, nope. My Tahoe, Avalanche, CR-V, and Bravada, in that order, all felt better in the snow. The XV may be fun to throw around a parking lot with no lightposts, but I want the car to go exactly where I point it in the snow (when driving cautiously), not where it wants to go or after a 2-second delay (steering snow plow is horrible). Now to be fair I didn't get any real snow after my Rial wheels with Blizzaks, but the stockers scared me enough to do the 2 sets of wheels routine. I honestly think there is a little hype around the Subaru name. They have cashed in on their history and are now letting their customers down to make more $.
If you felt "bashed" in my response, then that's on you. Certainly wasn't my intent.
But you are right about getting bashed in this one. ;-)
There is NO WAY IN HELL that your Olds Bravada is better in the snow IN ANY capacity than your XV. No way, Uh-uh, I call bullsh*t on that one!! LOL!
I guess it's all a matter of perspective. (And how capable someone is driving in the snow.) I'm no expert in snow-driving. I don't like it one bit. Live in a rural part of Western VA off of a road called Mtn Pass Rd. When it snows these hillbillys DO NOT plow!! My heavy Escalade with perfectly functioning 4WD felt like it was all over the place. I bought it new in 2015 and got stuck in the snow once here in VA and back home in NJ. The day the Caddy got stuck in VA, I walked the 2 miles back to the house and got the XV and drove right by the Caddy!
I guess my point is...I suck in snow driving. Hate it, not good in it, whatever you want to call it. But my Subaru has made it easier, safer, and basically a no-brainer!
Even my first Subaru, the 2012 Outback Sport (dressed up Impreza), was excellent in snow.
Later,
Keith
 

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^^^^
But to be fair to you, AWDfreak did say something that made me think..:eek:...I've always had 5-spd Subarus. Maybe that makes them superior in the snow than the snooze-fest automatics. :cool:
I'll give you that. Maybe. :D
-Keith
 

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No I didn't feel bashed, poor choice of words, but I did expect to get bashed by diehards on the snow topic. It is fact, for me, that those four vehicles have out performed the XV so far. Again it may the stock Yokohama's. But I have run BFG's, Continentals, and Bridgestone, at least, on those 4 with no issues. The big surprise was the CR-V outperforming the Bravada. Come to think of it weight may have something to do with it. The XV is lighter and almost floats. I think more FWD bias might help, too. I have been driving PA winters for 27 years so I don't think it is driver error. That Escalade should do just about anything you want it to. The only thing to remember with it is it is heavy, once it does get out of whack you are along for the ride. If you respect it, it should be unstoppable. My Tahoe with BFG AT's was a tank. I really hope it is a tire thing with the XV and I am more confident this winter.

If you felt "bashed" in my response, then that's on you. Certainly wasn't my intent.
But you are right about getting bashed in this one. ;-)
There is NO WAY IN HELL that your Olds Bravada is better in the snow IN ANY capacity than your XV. No way, Uh-uh, I call bullsh*t on that one!! LOL!
I guess it's all a matter of perspective. (And how capable someone is driving in the snow.) I'm no expert in snow-driving. I don't like it one bit. Live in a rural part of Western VA off of a road called Mtn Pass Rd. When it snows these hillbillys DO NOT plow!! My heavy Escalade with perfectly functioning 4WD felt like it was all over the place. I bought it new in 2015 and got stuck in the snow once here in VA and back home in NJ. The day the Caddy got stuck in VA, I walked the 2 miles back to the house and got the XV and drove right by the Caddy!
I guess my point is...I suck in snow driving. Hate it, not good in it, whatever you want to call it. But my Subaru has made it easier, safer, and basically a no-brainer!
Even my first Subaru, the 2012 Outback Sport (dressed up Impreza), was excellent in snow.
Later,
Keith
 

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12 days into ownership

Chip above Driver side front turn signal!

View attachment 5485

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Wow... so disappointed. Only had this thing one month and already have a huge rock nick on my hood today. Even with the hood deflector. Guess I'm ordering Dr. ColorChip. :-( MotherF*&^%$&^!!!

I wonder how much it costs to bubble wrap my Crosstrek. /sarcasm.
 

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Yeah same here. Got a nice chip in the front bumper after week 2. What bugs me more is that i get metal shavings stuck in the clearcoat all the time and those begin to rust. So i have rusted brown specks all over my white paint. I always carry around a clay bar for this unfortunate reason.


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Hi Keith!

I just bought 2018 Crosstrek and has exact same problem in Calgary. Dealer says its not my problem and I had to take it to Subaru Canada.

I have been Toyota and Honda owner and this is my first Subie and my morale is down but little bit hope as I read your review. I was thinking I did wrong decision reading lots of positive reviews from outdoor enthusiasts.

Hopefully everything goes smooth except paint!
 

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I ended up just getting a clear-bra put on (professionally) the entire hood, the front bumper and side mirrors. It cost about $1100, but I don't worry myself senseless about paint dings anymore.
 

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Sorry but the paint complaint seems a little biased. I have a dark gray 17 and it is no worse for ware than my wife's 13 Honda CR-V paint wise and I take mine off-pavement and on the beach and she never does. So I am not buying Subaru paint is any worse than other brands, for sure not Honda.

As for snow - I won't get into that debate other than to say our last 7 inches of snow I had to help a F150 4WD and Grand Cherokee 4WD and I had no problems at all. That said I do run with a 2" lift and fat 235 Golander ATs on 16" wheels.
 

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^^
Don't think it's biased about the paint when there have been too many of the same complaints about it. I actually contacted Subaru in 2017 (or maybe 2016) and they acknowledged the issue with their paint and claimed there were looking into it. I also had this same issue with my previous Subaru
I just found this on Youtube with the same issue on the 2018 :(
https://youtu.be/_2utcvpRCzI

-Keith
 

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I've experienced paint "issues" with other makes/models. I heard the urban legend regarding Subaru paint and decided to jump on it with my first Subaru.

I had the full bonnet, front bumper side mirrors and shiny black (ugh) spoiler SunTek clear wrapped. I also had the rear "diffuser" wrapped matte black. The entire service ran me about what DCLewis paid. The peace-of-mind is already worth it as I can be a bit nutty about paint condition and I intend on holding on to this car for at least 5 years.
 

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It's all the of the Japanese auto makers paint. It's hard for some to admit but the domestic (Ford, Chrysler and GM) automakers paint jobs are nicer these days. Start comparing finishes, you'll be surprised. Japans automakers, as of lately are trying to squeeze more profit any way they can.
 

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It's all the of the Japanese auto makers paint. It's hard for some to admit but the domestic (Ford, Chrysler and GM) automakers paint jobs are nicer these days. Start comparing finishes, you'll be surprised. Japans automakers, as of lately are trying to squeeze more profit any way they can.
I won't try to "speak" to the quality of Ford & GM water-based paint because I have no modern experience with them. But I can "speak" to Chrysler products as I had two FCA cars. I felt like I was constantly worried about anything coming near my paint... chips galore. I ended up wrapping the bonnet, spoiler and rear hatch of my A500. The paint code is Chrysler.

I know it's been mentioned here already, but the race to be "green" has more to do with modern automotive paint quality than any other factor. Subaru proudly proclaims how green they are so...
 
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