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links to two sources:
Automotive News: http://www.autonews.com/article/20130927/OEM11/130929913/subaru-leads-new-iihs-ratings-of-automatic-braking-technology#axzz2gDBGymlv

IIHS: http://www.iihs.org/iihs/news/desktopnews/iihs-issues-first-crash-avoidance-ratings-under-new-test-program-7-midsize-vehicles-earn-top-marks-for-front-crash-prevention


Automotive News
article:
Subaru leads new IIHS ratings of automatic braking technology

Author: Gabe Nelson
of Automotive News

Subaru engineers worked for nearly 20 years to ready EyeSight, a package of cameras and software that scans the road ahead for danger.

All that in-house work paid off today, when the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the Subaru Legacy and Outback top honors in its first ratings of automatic braking systems.

The new ratings, which will be used to select IIHS Top Safety Pick+ winners for 2014, are a sign of how the safety battleground is shifting in the auto industry, now that automakers are focusing more heavily on software and sensors -- not just airbags and steel -- to keep their customers safe.

In the tests, the Legacy and Outback detected a dummy car on the road and braked from 25 mph to a stop in time to avoid slamming into it. They were the only vehicles tested that came to a full stop, though five others -- the Cadillac ATS and SRX, Volvo S60 and XC60, and Mercedes-Benz C class -- slowed enough to win a "superior" rating from the IIHS.

Those seven models will get the biggest bragging rights under the Top Safety Pick+ rankings for 2014, marking the first time the IIHS has used any tests besides crash tests to pick its winners.

"You're going to see more of this from us," said David Zuby, chief research officer at the IIHS. "Crash prevention technology is out there, and it's very promising, but it's also very confusing. We're going to do our best to untangle the confusion and encourage manufacturers to adopt what we know is working."

The change in the IIHS' closely watched Top Safety Pick program comes as automakers step up promotion of advanced safety features that can cost $1,000 or more. In the past few years, the insurance industry-funded group started to single out automatic braking for praise, saying that insurance claim data showed fewer crashes for vehicles with Volvo's City Safety package.

For now, the IIHS hopes its new ratings will help customers understand what they're getting for their money. Based on the marketing, "you'd think the systems all pretty much do the same thing," Zuby said. "But we're finding that's not the case."

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is studying automatic braking, too. The agency said in a statement it has been doing "intensive" research on the technology and will decide in the next several months how to evaluate or regulate individual packages; a mandate is one option.

NHTSA also applauded the new rating system, saying it "looks forward to seeing how vehicle manufacturers respond to these new rating criteria and the safety benefits it will yield consumers."

How the test works

Because the IIHS was testing the vehicles' software and sensors, not their structural integrity, the group did not need to total any vehicles.

Instead, the vehicles were set in motion behind a German-made foam dummy with a metal frame and vinyl cover that was designed to resemble a car to radar and image recognition software. It has a pocket for a license plate, because many systems look for a license plate to differentiate a vehicle from, say, a trash can.

For today's ratings, the IIHS tested only mid-sized crossovers, SUVs and sedans , but testing will roll out to other vehicle categories over the coming year.

The second-highest honor, "advanced," went to certain trim levels of eight models: the Acura MDX, Audi A4 and Q5, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Lexus ES, Mazda6 and Volvo S60 and XC60. (The Volvo models appear twice because Volvo's City Safety package has two versions, one more aggressive than the other.)

Thirty models received a "basic" rating for including forward collision warnings but not automatic braking. Starting in 2014, at least a "basic" rating will be a prerequisite for Top Safety Pick+ honors, the highest that the IIHS awards.

The other 36 models in the mid-sized SUV and sedan segments had neither forward collision warning nor automatic braking. They include some of the top-selling nameplates in their segments, such as the Toyota Camry, Nissan Altima and Honda Pilot.

Vindication for Subaru

Testing of auto-braking systems is complicated by the varying technology used by automakers, and their differing philosophies on how it should work. Some want the vehicle to slam on the brakes fast and hard. Others are more wary of false alarms, so they hold back, delaying the automatic braking to avoid taking control away from the driver.

IIHS zeroed in on the difference. The group says that three vehicles -- the BMW 3 series, Infiniti JX (now known as the QX60) and Toyota Prius V -- were labeled as having automatic braking, but they barely braked before slamming into the dummy car on IIHS' test track.

EyeSight, on the other hand, worked better than advertised.

Subaru says EyeSight works up to a speed differential of 19 mph -- that is, when the difference between the Subaru and the vehicle in front of it is 19 mph or less -- but IIHS testing found that it worked just fine at 25 mph. The automaker says it helps that EyeSight uses a stereo camera, while some systems rely more heavily on radar, which is less sophisticated, and less expensive.

"It feels good to be vindicated -- no doubt about that," Subaru spokesman Michael McHale said of the 20-year in-house effort. The new rating system, he added, "sends a clear message that not all systems are the same."


Cadillac works out the kinks

The most surprising performer in the group may have been Cadillac, which has started offering more high-tech safety features as part of General Motors' plan to put the brand on level footing with European luxury makes.

GM started to offer automatic braking in the 2013 Cadillac ATS sedan and SRX crossover as part of a "driver assistance" package.

To get it ready for launch, engineers had to work out some kinks. At first the system had trouble recognizing oddly shaped trucks and very small cars, such as the MG Midget roadster of the 1970s, said Chad Zagorski, an active-safety engineer at General Motors, during a recent demonstration at the automaker's proving ground in Milford, Mich.

Zagorski said that when the vehicle detects an imminent collision, it applies 30 percent of braking power, and then ramps up to 100 percent. The system works up to a speed differential of roughly 22 mph. At higher speeds the braking boost may not be enough to stop a crash altogether, but it will usually "scrub" enough speed to soften the impact.

Why not go straight to 100 percent? The reason is that in the event of a false alarm, slamming the brakes as hard as possible could jar the driver or cause a pileup in traffic.

If the driver also hits the brakes, the vehicle detects that it is not a false alarm and delivers full braking power, Zagorski said.

Trusting the driver to drive is key, he said. For instance, if the driver wants to closely follow the vehicle ahead, the software won't interfere.

"I'll let you tailgate all day long," he said, describing how the software he helped design interacts with the driver. "I'm not that much of a nanny right now."

Read more: http://www.autonews.com/article/20130927/OEM11/130929913/subaru-leads-new-iihs-ratings-of-automatic-braking-technology#ixzz2gDDMyZ5p
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IIHS (Insurance Institute of Highway Safety) article:
ARLINGTON, Va. — A new test program by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) rates the performance of front crash prevention systems to help consumers decide which features to consider and encourage automakers to speed adoption of the technology. The rating system is based on research by the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) indicating that forward collision warning and automatic braking systems are helping drivers avoid front-to-rear crashes.

The Institute rates models with optional or standard front crash prevention systems as superior, advanced or basic depending on whether they offer autonomous braking, or autobrake, and, if so, how effective it is in tests at 12 and 25 mph. Vehicles rated superior have autobrake and can avoid a crash or substantially reduce speeds in both tests. For an advanced rating a vehicle must have autobrake and avoid a crash or reduce speeds by at least 5 mph in 1 of 2 tests.

To earn a basic rating, a vehicle must have a forward collision warning system that meets National Highway Traffic Safety Administration performance criteria. For a NHTSA endorsement, a system must issue a warning before a specified time in 5 of 7 test trials under three scenarios. The agency identifies vehicles with compliant systems as part of its online ratings.

Moderately priced and luxury midsize cars and SUVs are the first to be evaluated in the new IIHS test program. These include 74 vehicles, all 2013-14 models. Seven earn the highest rating of superior when equipped with optional autobrake and forward collision warning systems. They are the Cadillac ATS sedan and SRX SUV, Mercedes-Benz C-Class sedan, Subaru Legacy sedan and Outback wagon, Volvo S60 sedan and XC60 SUV.

Six models earn an advanced rating when equipped with autobrake and forward collision warning. These include the 2014 Acura MDX SUV, Audi A4 sedan and Q5 SUV, 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SUV, Lexus ES sedan and the 2014 Mazda 6 sedan. In addition, the Volvo S60 and XC60 earn an advanced rating when they aren't equipped with an option called Collision Warning with Full Auto Brake and Pedestrian Detection. The S60 and XC60 are the only models in the new test program with standard autobrake. Called City Safety, the system brakes to avoid a front-to-rear crash in certain low-speed conditions without warning the driver before it takes action.

Twenty-five other vehicles earn a basic rating. Three models available with forward collision warning earn higher ratings when equipped with autobrake. They are the 2014 Acura MDX and the Cadillac ATS and SRX. Thirty-six models either don't offer a front crash prevention system, or they have a system that doesn't meet NHTSA or IIHS criteria.

"Front crash prevention systems can add a thousand dollars or more to the cost of a new car. Our new ratings let consumers know which systems offer the most promise for the extra expense," says David Zuby, IIHS chief research officer.

The front crash prevention ratings complement the Institute's long-standing crash test program telling consumers how well passenger vehicles protect people in a range of crash configurations. In its crashworthiness program, the Institute rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal or poor based on performance in moderate overlap front, small overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraint evaluations.

For crash avoidance technologies, the Institute developed a three-tier rating system of superior, advanced and basic to reflect that even a basic forward collision warning system can provide significant benefits.
About the technology

Front crash prevention is part of a larger group of crash avoidance features spreading through the U.S. vehicle fleet. Marketed under various trade names, system capabilities vary by manufacturer and model, and most are offered as optional add-ons. In general, current front crash prevention systems fall into two categories: forward collision warning and front crash mitigation or prevention with autobrake.

Forward collision warning alerts a driver when the system detects that the vehicle is about to crash into the vehicle in front, but the system doesn't slow down or stop the vehicle. Some forward collision warning systems are combined with an autobrake system to reduce vehicle speeds in a crash, but they aren't designed to avoid the collision. Acura's Collision Mitigation Brake System is an example.

Other autobrake systems can slow down or completely stop the car to avoid some front-to-rear crashes if its driver doesn't brake or steer out of the way in response to a warning. Like the Acura system, these will reduce the speed of those crashes they can't prevent. Cadillac's Automatic Collision Preparation and Volvo's Collision Warning with Full Auto Brake and Pedestrian Detection combined with City Safety are examples.

Another design difference involves whether the vehicle ahead is stopped or moving. All of the front crash prevention systems that earn a superior or advanced rating from IIHS are capable of braking for a stopped or slower-moving vehicle. Some other systems are designed to brake for a stopped car ahead only if sensors first detect the car moving before it stops. The 2013 BMW 3 series sedan is available with this type of system. It gets a basic rating for front crash prevention.

"The point of autobrake systems is to help inattentive drivers avoid rear-ending another car," Zuby explains. "It's clear that the ability to automatically brake for both stopped and moving vehicles prevents the most crashes."
Test track evaluations

To gauge how autobrake systems from different manufacturers perform, the Institute conducted a series of five test runs at speeds of 12 and 25 mph on the track at the Vehicle Research Center in Ruckersville, Va. In each test, an engineer drove the vehicle toward a stationary target designed to simulate the back of a car. Sensors in the test vehicle monitored its lane position, speed, time to collision, braking and other data. The IIHS protocol is similar to the procedure the European New Car Assessment Programme uses to evaluate autobrake systems, which the group plans to begin rating in 2014.

The Institute awards as many as five points in the autobrake tests, based on how much the systems slow the vehicle to avoid hitting the inflatable target or lessen the severity of the impact. In the case of an unavoidable collision, lowering the striking vehicle's speed reduces the crash energy that vehicle structures and restraint systems have to manage. That reduces the amount of damage to both the striking and struck car and minimizes injuries to people traveling in them.

"We decided on 25 mph because development testing indicated that results at this speed were indicative of results at higher speeds — and because higher-speed tests would risk damaging the test vehicles," Zuby says. "As such, we expect crash mitigation benefits at higher speeds as well."

IIHS target

Running into an actual car puts the test driver at risk and is expensive, so IIHS uses a stationary target as a stand-in. Under the vinyl cover, inflatable tubes and foam sit on a metal frame, which is then affixed to metal guides on the track to keep the target from moving until it is struck by the test vehicle. A GPS system and other sensors monitor the test vehicle's lane position, speed, time to collision, braking and other data. An onboard camera captures each test run from the driver's perspective and monitors any warnings issued by the front crash prevention system.

In addition to points in the autobrake tests, vehicles earn one point if they have a forward collision warning system that meets NHTSA criteria. That means vehicles can earn a maximum of six points total for front crash prevention. Models with one point earn a basic rating. A total of 2 to 4 points qualifies vehicles for an advanced rating, and 5 to 6 points qualifies vehicles for a superior rating.

The highest-scoring cars and SUVs have autobrake and substantially reduce speeds in both the 12 and 25 mph tests. Most of these systems prevent the 12 mph collision.

Subaru's EyeSight performed best. It helped the Legacy and Outback avoid hitting the target at both test speeds. Next best was Cadillac's Automatic Collision Preparation. The system helped the ATS and SRX avoid hitting the target in the 12 mph test and reduced the ATS's speed by 15 mph and the SRX's speed by 19 mph in the 25 mph test.

"We want to help get the most effective systems in as many vehicles as soon as possible. That means a speed mitigation system like Subaru's EyeSight that can prevent crashes at low and moderate speeds," Zuby says. "At the same time, we want consumers to know that forward collision warning alone can help them avoid crashes, and it's a feature that's available on more models than autobrake."

Besides the 2013 BMW 3 series, another midsize model advertised with autobrake also earns a basic rating. In tests of the Infiniti JX SUV, there was only minimal braking at 12 and 25 mph. The Toyota Prius v wagon, which claims to have autobrake, had minimal braking in IIHS tests and currently fails to meet NHTSA criteria for forward collision warning. It doesn't qualify for an IIHS front crash prevention rating.
New criteria for highest safety accolade

The Institute introduced the TOP SAFETY PICK+ award last year to recognize models with the best crash protection. To qualify for the 2014 award, vehicles must earn a basic, advanced or superior rating for front crash prevention. This is in addition to a good or acceptable rating for occupant protection in a small overlap front crash, plus good ratings in the moderate overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraint tests.

To qualify for a 2014 TOP SAFETY PICK award, models must earn a good or acceptable rating in the small overlap front test, plus good ratings in the moderate overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraint tests. Winners of the 2014 awards will be announced in December.

You can expect EyeSight to appear in more Subaru models. Heck maybe even the whole lineup.


Honestly, I don't like the thought of more driver-assistance devices in a fun-only car, but for a daily driver, I actually welcome the idea since driving home tired from work is one of the situations one would really appreciate this kind of technology.

I consider myself an above-average driver, but the fact is, we are all humans and we all make mistakes. If I can have EyeSight in a daily driver (and have separate vehicles for fun stuff), I see it as a win-win.
 

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I watched the test video in the Outback. It was really impressive how it stopped with feet to spare from 25 MPH. All the other cars Bump drafted the Blow-up car down the road!!

Like the OP, I normally dismiss these type of gadgets as sales gimmicks....... but that test changed my mind. I would take it in a HB if offered on my next Subie.
 

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:mad:Hate it! Encourages texting, emailing etc. What about the person behind you without the system! Once these systems are proven, they will be required on all vehicles with NO off button. If you can't pay attention, take the farkin' bus! Mobile phone service providers must love this technology. It's crap! Sorry for the rant, I'm usually quite reserved, but enough is enough! Automatic rain-sensing wipers are bad enough. there are water droplets in your face, move your hand a couple inches and turn on the wipers! I think when you are involved in the act of driving(turning on lights, wipers, etc)it helps the driver, oh I don't know, stay INVOLVED in driving! Can't handle braking to avoid crashing into solid objects! Stay off the road!
 

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Yeah, I laughed out loud when I heard of automatic windshield wipers, and the automatic parallel parking. It's neat (is neat still used?) technology, but, come on!! Really?

I suppose the automatic braking could save an accident if the driver is asleep at the switch though.

Does this thing look out farther if you are going, say 65? How does it know if you are planning on going around an object instead of plowing straight into it?

I would think this would encourage some people to tailgate too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
EyeSight integrates:

* Pre-collision braking (reduces speed and/or avoids rear-ending someone)
* Pre-collision throttle management (reduces but does not completely remove throttle response)
* Automatic cruise control (speed is automatic, YOU STILL HAVE TO STEER)
* Lane departure and sway warning (keeps you awake)

http://youtu.be/8MMhN9B1Jos

http://youtu.be/gRbffo_62DE

At 65 MPH, if the cruise control can completely follow the car ahead, I have no doubt it can reduce the impact and damage at such a speed if an imminent object is detected.


As I have said before, it is NOT intended to replace the driver, nor is it to be relied upon entirely. Those who do use it in such a manner (completely depending on it to do all the work) will have an accident anyways and shouldn't be driving.
 

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AWDfreak said:
As I have said before, it is NOT intended to replace the driver, nor is it to be relied upon entirely. Those who do use it in such a manner (completely depending on it to do all the work) will have an accident anyways and shouldn't be driving.
Completely agree.
 

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Features that encourage less focus on driving. Driving is a discipline, those who are terrible at it, need the most practice and involvement, not the least. I'm really not trying to be controversial here, just hit my limit of features that inevitably encourage less involvement. I shudder to think what may happen to the next STi. C'mon AWDfreak, that attitude is a bit of a copout. Wouldn't it be nice to be able turn the VDC completely off on your Crosstrek? Once these "lowest common denominator" systems are in place, they're here to stay and that bums me out. :( :( :(
 

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Discussion Starter #9
juha said:
Features that encourage less focus on driving. Driving is a discipline, those who are terrible at it, need the most practice and involvement, not the least. I'm really not trying to be controversial here, just hit my limit of features that inevitably encourage less involvement. I shudder to think what may happen to the next STi. C'mon AWDfreak, that attitude is a bit of a copout. Wouldn't it be nice to be able turn the VDC completely off on your Crosstrek? Once these "lowest common denominator" systems are in place, they're here to stay and that bums me out. :( :( :(

What I truly believe is that these features will be most appreciated by those who are most experienced and/or those who actually try to drive as correctly as possible.

For new drivers, I think the best way to learn is with a vehicle that is very involving (i.e. manual transmission), where inattention is not an option.

Also, there have been a few close calls when I was driving sleepy (no other choice), and the only way I avoided those close calls were because of passengers warning me. If I had been driving alone, I might not be here typing.

So having a system waking oneself up would be a nice feature to have later on in life. I'm still a bit young right now, so I'll stick to manual transmissions and driving myself.


Shame the WRX STI is the only Subaru that can completely turn VDC off...

but here's a fix :)

DIY Disable VDC in 2012 Impreza/XV
 

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How can one appreciate something if you don't use it? So if a driver is attentive and never invokes one of these systems, where's the appreciation? I know I may seem like a bit of a jerk, but surely someone if not everyone here has driven a car with some of these systems in place. I remember driving a 1st gen "new" Mini. Had all electronic systems enabled, drove thru slalom in 3rd gear, throttle pinned to floor, electronics did the rest. Yawn. 3 series estate, automatic, floor it in a corner, just drives around. The software didn't save them, it prevented them from even approaching certain limits determined by engineers. So how does one learn control thru proper reactions if the actions necessary are completely avoided thru electronic intervention? I know these systems are here to stay, but I still say wah! :'( And no offense is intended with the vehicles mentioned. They are just the vehicles I have driven. :'(
 

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Discussion Starter #11
juha said:
How can one appreciate something if you don't use it? So if a driver is attentive and never invokes one of these systems, where's the appreciation? I know I may seem like a bit of a jerk, but surely someone if not everyone here has driven a car with some of these systems in place. I remember driving a 1st gen "new" Mini. Had all electronic systems enabled, drove thru slalom in 3rd gear, throttle pinned to floor, electronics did the rest. Yawn. 3 series estate, automatic, floor it in a corner, just drives around. The software didn't save them, it prevented them from even approaching certain limits determined by engineers. So how does one learn control thru proper reactions if the actions necessary are completely avoided thru electronic intervention? I know these systems are here to stay, but I still say wah! :'( And no offense is intended with the vehicles mentioned. They are just the vehicles I have driven. :'(
An attentive, very proficient driver can still trigger the system if it's still on.

There is no way a human being driver can be 100% correct all the time. Those who claim to be 100% correct and perfect drivers are very likely talking out of their ***. You drive around other fellow human beings, there is bound to be a situation where excellent drivers will trigger one or more of EyeSight's features.

However, like all electronic driver assistance systems, I wish for every last one of them to be able to be turned off.

So far, in the Subaru world, VDC and ABS cannot be completely disabled without implementing modifications and/or pulling fuses.

The WRX STI can completely defeat VDC (unlike other Subaru models), however, ABS cannot be defeated.


My theory is that with defeatable driver assistance systems (such as VDC stability and traction control, ABS, EyeSight) offered to proficient drivers will satisfy both enthusiasts and casual drivers alike. Problems arise when electronic nannies kill the fun for enthusiasts and/or when casual drivers overly rely on said electronic nannies.

I am an enthusiast driver but I can appreciate the use of driver aids in daily driving. Of course, when one wishes to drive in the most pure manner (such as spirited driving in a controlled environment i.e. race track), all systems, ideally, would be best turned off.


What it comes down to though, is that governments are too focused on trying to save people from themselves, therefore, implementing overly-protective systems that kill the fun on driving and reduce our already-bad drivers to nearly-useless drivers of motor vehicles. It's nice that they care about saving lives, but it's hit a point where it will begin to numb and lower driver involvement.

Another thing working against us driving enthusiasts is the seemingly-dwindling proportion of driving enthusiasts and car enthusiasts. My generation of people no longer see a car as fun and simply an overburden on one's wallet and environment.


As much as we want to enjoy our Subaru vehicles, we are at the mercy of the masses and overly-protective governments preferences for vehicles.
 

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There is no way anything, is correct 100% of the time. That includes drivers AND safety systems. I think you may be involved with selling Subarus! Insurance companies demand these systems have no "off" switch more than any one else. Otherwise I like the end of your post and agree completely. I hope I didn't start a philosophical discussion on absolutes! ;D
 

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juha said:
There is no way anything, is correct 100% of the time. That includes drivers AND safety systems. I think you may be involved with selling Subarus! Insurance companies demand these systems have no "off" switch more than any one else. Otherwise I like the end of your post and agree completely. I hope I didn't start a philosophical discussion on absolutes! ;D
Actually, I wish I did... The local Subaru dealerships don't have any openings, however, I am very confident that I could probably get a job working for Subaru sometime in my lifetime (if I survive through this hell I'm at right now)... maybe a parts service specialist or technician, or even a customer service representative (though that seems to be a bit of a stretch).


Indeed, safety systems aren't perfect, as they have the potential to remove control of the car from the driver.

Darn insurance companies seem to only be thinking about putting a leash on both car companies and drivers alike :(


Speaking of EyeSight, there's a 2nd generation EyeSight out already!

It seems Subaru wishes to aim for the best autonomous cars, however, because of their rally-heritage for driver-focused vehicles, I am almost positive the future technologies Subaru and FHI will introduce will be defeatable.

http://www.fhi.co.jp/english/news/press/2013/13_10_02e_92140.html

FHI Reveals the Next Generation "EyeSight"
- All-New Stereo Camera Recognition Technology and
Added Steering Assist Control for Better Safety and Further Reduced Driver's Workload -

Tokyo, October 2, 2013 – Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. (FHI), the manufacturer of Subaru automobiles, has developed its next generation "EyeSight" advanced driving assist system to enhance safety performance and further reduce burden on the driver. FHI has fully revamped the stereo camera system from current version of EyeSight for significantly improved recognition accuracy and added steering assist control features.

The next generation EyeSight adopts the revamped stereo camera system enhanced with color recognition technology combined with an approximately 40% increase of viewing angle and visibility distance, expanding visible range, improving object recognition accuracy, and allowing it to recognize brake lights and red signals. The changes are an upgrade to all the basic EyeSight functions of avoiding collisions, reducing collision damage and reducing driver's workload.

A new feature "Active Lane Keep System" has two functions. One is "Lane Keeping Assist" which recognizes the lines on both sides of the lane and has steering assist controls to keep the driver in the middle of the lane. The other one "Lane Departure Prevention Assist" will apply force to the steering wheel to suppress the deviation if the vehicle almost strays over the lane lines, enabling to further reduce the burden of driving. In addition, with color recognition for the stereo camera, EyeSight can detect brake lights of the vehicle ahead and link it to "Adaptive Cruise Control", allowing even faster deceleration when following vehicles compared to current performance.

The current EyeSight is a system that uses only stereo cameras to measure distances and recognize objects. Just as a driver senses much information visually, it can recognize things like other vehicles, pedestrians, bicycles, motorcycles and lane lines, and also control the vehicle. Moreover, it includes multiple driver assistance features, such as "Pre-Collision Braking Control" to slow or stop the vehicle with automatic braking. Affordably priced at 100,000 JPY (tax excluded), EyeSight is a very popular feature with customers. The accumulated sales of the EyeSight-equipped models have surpassed 150,000 units*1 in Japan.

FHI is advancing the development for an achievement of "autonomous driving" as a safety technology to prevent traffic accidents aiming for zero accidents by automobiles. FHI is now one step closer to this goal with the new EyeSight system. Under the "Confidence in Motion" brand statement, FHI will continue to offer Subaru's distinctive "Enjoyment and Peace of Mind" driving experience through its commitment to safety represented in the EyeSight technology as well as its continued pursuit of driving excellence.

The functions of newly-developed next generation EyeSight will be employed on new vehicles scheduled for release in Japan in 2014, rolled out to all models sequentially.

*1 According to in-house research (As of end of Sept. 2013)
[Next generation EyeSight Features]

<Active Lane Keep System> (New)

Lane Keeping Assist
If EyeSight can recognize the lines on both sides of the lane when driving above approximately 65 km/h with Adaptive Cruise Control activated, it will automatically steer the vehicle to keep it in the middle of the lane. This greatly reduces the burden on the driver and supports stable driving. The system determines whether the driver is operating the steering wheel or not and if not in operation, it will turn this feature off.
Lane Departure Prevention Assist
If the vehicle is straying from the lines when driving over approximately 65 km/h as on limited-access highways, EyeSight will display and sound the lane departure warning and apply torque to the steering wheel to correct steering back to the center of the lane and suppress lane deviation.

<Pre-Collision Braking Control>

The relative speed at which automatic braking is possible to avoid a collision between the vehicle and an object or reduce damage has been increased to approximately 50 km/h.
By expanding visible range, stereo cameras can detect pedestrians crossing a street and pre-collision braking is applied at an earlier stage, enhancing performance of pedestrian protection.

<Adaptive Cruise Control> (Brake light recognition: New)

The stereo cameras have been improved to increase response to acceleration and deceleration by the vehicle ahead, as well as improved performance in terms of tracking merging vehicles ahead and corners.
With color recognition for the stereo cameras, EyeSight can detect brake lights of the vehicle ahead and link it to Adaptive Cruise Control, allowing even faster deceleration when following vehicles.

<Pre-Collision Reverse Throttle Management> (New)

If the system detects sudden accelerator input when in reverse, it displays and sounds a warning on sudden unintended acceleration and overrides the throttle to restrict abrupt driving in reverse.

<Hazard Avoidance Assist> (New)

If the system determines that collision with another vehicle or other obstacle in front of the vehicle is possible, it will assist the driver in steering to avoid the collision with integrated vehicle control technology in the VDC.

Note: The names of new functions are tentative.
Note: The performance of features above may diminish due to factors such as road, weather, and vehicle conditions.
http://www.fhi.co.jp/english/contents/pdf_en_92140.pdf

http://www.torquenews.com/1084/how-subaru-will-build-safest-cars-planet-2014

次世代「アイサイト(EyeSight)」発表会
 
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