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Discussion Starter #1
I'm hauling a Journey XL Basecamp from Free Spirit Recreation and I've used up a set of tires every season. The rear tires become very square. The trailer is 900 dry weight with 90 lb tongue weight. We can't decide if the angle of attack change on the car or the jerking around from the trailer is the cause. But we are very tired of replacing the tires every fall. Any suggestions? :confused:
 

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Yeah, stop towing with the wrong vehicle. I know you'll likely reply something to the effect of "but my last car could do it" or "the crosstrek manual says..."

So here's a fact- squat. When IRS suspension squats it gains toe (a good thing in the realm of racing!) when towing, the ass end of your subie is in a permanent squat. Thus, your alignment while driving is off.

The only thing I could even imagine attempting to rectify this abomination (towing a camper with a car) is to have an alignment of the rear suspension done WHILE the trailer is connected. Good luck finding a knowledgeable and trustworthy shop willing to attempt that!

Even then, that would cause the same issue when driving without a trailer connected.
 

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What kind of wear is occurring? Feathering? Inside shoulder of tread?

If it's excessive toe as Subarust points out, that would explain the premature tire wear and should have some visible treadwear that appears to have a somewhat-sideways pattern to the wear. In applications for towing, as much as I love my independent suspension, a straight-axle suspension like some of the remaining conventional body-on-frame vehicles with that suspension design are superior for towing due to less worries of alignment being an issue with tire wear for towing applications.

If excessive negative camber is a factor, the inside shoulder of tread will have more wear than the center of tread and/or outside of tread.
 

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I would recommend adding weight distribution bars. That will return the vehicle to level. ( I am suspect of this cars ability to tow and I would double check all the numbers to make sure you are safe. Remember, anything can yank; maintaining control and maintaining the ability to urgently brake is where the math and experience comes in.)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Weight Distribution Bars

Not sure I can use weigh distribution bars on a single yoke two wheel trailer.
 

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I realize this thread is 2 years old but this information will benefit anyone else in this situation:

Try upgrading to stiffer rear suspension. This may reduce the squat effect of the weight you're now causing on the rear of the vehicle will help. the load is not being distributed evenly causing the rear of your car to take the brunt of it. like others have said, during squat your wheels lean inward towards the differential increasing your toe and camber which is causing your tires to wear out rapidly. most trucks & suv's rated for towing use electronic leveling that will detect when the rear is being forced downward and it will adjust the suspension or other people use air bags to bring the rear back up.
 
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